The Ur Region Archaeology Project Iraq

At Kirintec we are all about innovation and how to best advance our customer’s response with our products and knowledge.

 

We have chosen to sponsor a remarkable project that we have learnt and hope to make a difference. We balance the juxtaposition of the new with the old…. in fact, the ancient. The Kirintec team is so thrilled to be part of an amazing project in Iraq, specifically the UR Region Archaeological project Iraq, which will help provide something positive for Iraq’s cultural heritage.

 

At first glance such a partnership may seem to some as surprising, but for us working in counter terrorism there probably isn’t a more poignant landscape to have an effect upon, as the world stands up to be counted.

 

Make no mistake, we aren’t about to become political, it really is about highlighting a venture that positively affects non-renewable resources. Once destroyed or excavated by archaeologists sites are quite literally gone forever and can’t be replaced.

 

The press has documented that Daesh – or the so called Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), which has taken over large swathes of land in Iraq and Syria, is reportedly selling ancient Iraqi artefacts in the black market. This is leaving Iraq’s cultural heritage in danger.  However, the work we are helping to fund is set to redress the balance.

 

You may know Iraq for many reasons, given their difficult recent history. But perhaps what you are unaware of is that Iraq – the home to around 33 million people, was also home to some of the earliest civilisations. We aim to perhaps surprise some of you that these civilisations were rich with culture, beyond Babylon.

 

Iraq is roughly the same area as Sweden, so expect to be amazed when we relay some of the artefacts that are being uncovered in this vast country.

 

We are excited to be sharing the story so far and findings relayed by Dr Jane Moon OBE, the Co-Director or UR Region Archaeology project Iraq.

 

As you are probably aware archaeology is the study of past human behaviour through the systematic recovery and analysis of material remains or objects. Such treasures are called artefacts and provide evidence to us in modern civilisation of past cultures. It should provide a greater understanding of Iraq’s ancient past and a record that cannot be lost and now be preserved for the future and for so many years to come.

 

We feel privileged to share the story so far and wait with baited breath as we relay what is uncovered in the Middle East. We respect Dr Moon and her team’s work, passion and desire to preserve.

 

My next post will underline how the project came about.

Picture: The 2016 UR region archaeology project Iraq team.

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